Mindfulness Meets Improvisation-Part V-Cultivate Generosity

In part I of this series we explored how both practices help with listening, responding, and being present.  In Part II, we talked about starting anywhere, Part III, embracing uncertainty, and Part IV-on being kind!  

Here we explore how these two seemingly different practices both help us to: Cultivate Generosity!

When we are confident in our ability to meet our lives, moment by moment, we can afford to relax and be generous with ourselves and others.   We can take the long view and put things into perspective.  We don’t have to take ourselves so seriously.  In practicing mindfulness, once our minds settle even for a moment, we begin to connect with spaciousness, the feeling that there is enough room for things to be just the way they are.  

The ducks can just float by – we don’t have to line them all up.  

We recognize our thoughts and then practice letting them go.  We have the opportunity to further practice this when we improvise.  We have an idea of what to do next and then the situation changes and we have to shift gears, letting go of our idea.  By continuously letting go of our ideas, thoughts and scenarios in our heads and opening up to the moment fresh and curious we create the spaciousness to go with the flow.  

In the flow we start to see the bigger picture and how we can jump in and be generous.

If you are interested in experiencing these two practices (and we hope you are), join Beth Boynton and me for our exciting launch of the workshop:

Stronger Together:  The Extra Strength PILL for Connecting with Presence & Fun 

We believe you will exhale, laugh, and leave sessions feeling stronger together!

Mindfulness and improvisation?  To help people develop emotional intelligence, good communication skills, presence and deeper connections?  Granted, it’s a little out of the box.  But most fun, cutting edge and innovative stuff is.  -Liz Korabek-Emerson

Liz is a certified mindfulness instructor, transformational workshop leader and creative coach dedicated to helping people become more resilient through mindfulness.  Since 2012 she has been designing and leading mindfulness programs for individuals and organizations including the Portsmouth Hospital, Liberty Mutual, and Riverwoods Retirement community.  She also holds an MFA in theatre and brings thirty years of experience creating and directing theatre to teaching programs that are empowering, creative and engaging.  Learn more at Korabek Training.

 

Mindfulness Meets Improvisation-Part IV-Be Kind!

In part I of this series we explored how both practices help with listening, responding, and being present.  In Part II, we talked about starting anywhere and in Part III, embracing uncertainty!  Here we explore how these two seemingly different practices both help us to:

Be Kind

When we practice mindfulness, slowing down to place our awareness in the present moment, many of us are surprised to discover the vulnerability that arises in that experience.  Is this what we are trying to avoid with the speed and busyness of our lives?  But it is recognizing and accepting our inherent vulnerability that we learn the importance of kindness.  When we drop the armor of busyness, we connect to our humanity and our kind tender heart.  We can extend kindness to ourselves and others.

When we drop the armor of busyness, we connect to our humanity and our kind tender heart.  We can extend kindness to ourselves and others.

In the improvisation, everyone is on equal footing.  There are moments of stumbling, false starts or misunderstandings.  Our vulnerability shows through and we have the opportunity in the moment to forgive ourselves and lend a hand to others.

If you are interested in experiencing these two practices (and we hope you are), join Beth Boynton and me for our exciting launch of the workshop:

Stronger Together:  The Extra Strength PILL for Connecting with Presence & Fun 

(Catch the Early Bird rate through 7/19/17)

We believe you will exhale, laugh, and leave sessions feeling stronger together!

Mindfulness and improvisation?  To help people develop emotional intelligence, good communication skills, presence and deeper connections?  Granted, it’s a little out of the box.  But most fun, cutting edge and innovative stuff is.  -Liz Korabek-Emerson

Liz is a certified mindfulness instructor, transformational workshop leader and creative coach dedicated to helping people become more resilient through mindfulness.  Since 2012 she has been designing and leading mindfulness programs for individuals and organizations including the Portsmouth Hospital, Liberty Mutual, and Riverwoods Retirement community.  She also holds an MFA in theatre and brings thirty years of experience creating and directing theatre to teaching programs that are empowering, creative and engaging.  Learn more at Korabek Training.

 

Mindfulness Meets Improvisation-Part III-Embrace Uncertainty

In part I of this series we explored how both practices help with listening, responding, and being present.  In Part II, we talked about starting anywhere!  Here we explore how these two seemingly different practices both help us to:

Embrace Uncertainty

Anything can happen . . .and it usually does!  But most of don’t like that.  So we spend our time and energy trying to resist or predict or manage what is going to happen to us next.  And we wonder why we are so stressed!  Mindfulness and improvisation both allow us to relax with the uncertainty of the next moment.  

We meet it and then let it go.  

When we slow down enough to be with what is actually happening, its usually not as bad as we think, or if it is challenging, we see that we do have the resources to handle it.  Often,  someone, our scene partner steps in to help us.  In the improvisation no one knows what is going to happen next so we get the opportunity to consciously practice meeting the next unknown moment.  The uncertainty of creating on the spot teaches us to relax and become more confident in our ability to meet the new twist in the unfolding plot . . . of our lives.   

If you are interested in experiencing these two practices, join Beth Boynton and me for our exciting launch of the workshop:

Stronger Together:  The Extra Strength PILL for Connecting with Presence & Fun 

(Catch the Early Bird rate through 7/19/17)

We believe you will exhale, laugh, and leave sessions feeling stronger together!

Mindfulness and improvisation?  To help people develop emotional intelligence, good communication skills, presence and deeper connections?  Granted, it’s a little out of the box.  But most fun, cutting edge and innovative stuff is.  -Liz Korabek-Emerson

Liz is a certified mindfulness instructor, transformational workshop leader and creative coach dedicated to helping people become more resilient through mindfulness.  Since 2012 she has been designing and leading mindfulness programs for individuals and organizations including the Portsmouth Hospital, Liberty Mutual, and Riverwoods Retirement community.  She also holds an MFA in theatre and brings thirty years of experience creating and directing theatre to teaching programs that are empowering, creative and engaging.  Learn more at Korabek Training.

 

Mindfulness Meets Improvisation-Part II-Start Anywhere!

In part I of this series we explored how both practices help with listening, responding, and being present.  In this post, we start anywhere!

Mindfulness and improvisation are both practices that encourage us to jump in and start, even when we don’t have all our ducks in a row.  When we train the mind to be in the present moment, just the way it is; good, not so good or it will have to do, we begin to develop the ability to trust ourselves and our situations, even when they are uncomfortable or challenging.  This quality of trust allows us to let go waiting for the perfect moment, dress size, job, family, or self-improved version of ourselves in order to live our lives fully with appreciation and joy.  We can start now.  By making the leap of faith to be in the present moment fully! Here we learn to let go of our perfectionism, judgments and the inner critic that is all too ready to keep us from leaping into our lives, relationships, and circumstances.  

Do not wait until the conditions are perfect to begin.  Beginning makes the conditions perfect.  –Alan Cohen

If you are interested in experiencing these two practices, join Beth Boynton and me for our exciting launch of the workshop:

Stronger Together:  The Extra Strength PILL for Connecting with Presence & Fun 

(Catch the Early Bird rate through 7/19/17)

We believe you will exhale, laugh, and leave sessions feeling stronger together!

Mindfulness and improvisation?  To help people develop emotional intelligence, good communication skills, presence and deeper connections?  Granted, it’s a little out of the box.  But most fun, cutting edge and innovative stuff is.  -Liz Korabek-Emerson

Liz is a certified mindfulness instructor, transformational workshop leader and creative coach dedicated to helping people become more resilient through mindfulness.  Since 2012 she has been designing and leading mindfulness programs for individuals and organizations including the Portsmouth Hospital, Liberty Mutual, and Riverwoods Retirement community.  She also holds an MFA in theatre and brings thirty years of experience creating and directing theatre to teaching programs that are empowering, creative and engaging.  Learn more at Korabek Training.

Mindfulness Meets Improvisation-Part 1: Listen and Respond

According to applied improvisation blogger, Rachel Ben there are six ways that mindfulness and improvisation align with each other.  

  1. Listen and Respond
  2. Be Present
  3. Start Anywhere
  4. Embrace Uncertainty
  5. Be Kind
  6. Cultivate Generosity

The first is that both practices teach us to listen and respond.  Mindfulness, in fact, is sometimes described as “deep listening”  because in mindfulness meditation we are training the mind to let go of the internal chatter in our heads that ruminates about the past and worries about the future in order to simply observe our present moment experience.  When we can let go of that chatter, we can actually give our full attention to the person who is speaking and respond genuinely.  While mindfulness is generally practiced and taught as meditation; seated, eyes closed and silent, it can also be developed, cultivated and practiced on our feet, with our eyes open while we are interacting with other people.  It is not our posture that makes us mindful, it is how we focus our attention.  

Eighty percent of success is showing up   –Woody Allen

One of the most obvious ways that mindfulness and improvisation align is that they both teach us to be present.  The mind wanders.  Have you ever noticed?  It just does. And it thinks, a lot.  In mindfulness, we are not trying to get rid of our thoughts.  We are trying to stop chasing them so we can “stay put” with the problem we are wresting with or the conversation we are having.  We learn to “stay put” by giving the mind something stay put on that is actually happening right NOW; our breath, sounds in the room, the funny thing our scene partner just said, etc.  When we can focus on what is happening NOW with an open and flexible mind, we feel present.  We are in the game.  

If you are interested in experiencing two practices, join Beth Boynton and me for our exciting launch of the workshop:

Stronger Together:  The Extra Strength PILL for Connecting with Presence & Fun

Mindfulness and improvisation?  To help people develop emotional intelligence, good communication skills, presence and deeper connections?  Granted, it’s a little out of the box.  But most fun, cutting edge and innovative stuff is.  -Liz Korabek-Emerson

Bio

Liz is a certified mindfulness instructor, transformational workshop leader and creative coach dedicated to helping people become more resilient through mindfulness.  Since 2012 she has been designing and leading mindfulness programs for individuals and organizations including the Portsmouth Hospital, Liberty Mutual, and Riverwoods Retirement community.  She also holds an MFA in theatre and brings thirty years of experience creating and directing theatre to teaching programs that are empowering, creative and engaging.  Learn more at Korabek Training.